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  • Fig3e_s

    September 03, 2013

    Observed transit for GJ 1214 b

    Observed transit depths and theoretical models for GJ 1214 b

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  • Hs-2013-26-c-print

    July 11, 2013

    Visible-light Color of Planets Plot

    This plot compares the colors of solar system planets to the color of the hot-Jupiter-class planet HD 189733b.

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  • Ssc2013-01a_inline

    January 08, 2013

    Probing Brown Dwarf Layers

    This graph shows the brightness variations of the brown dwarf named 2MASSJ22282889-431026 measured simultaneously by both NASA's Hubble and Spitzer space telescopes.

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  • Eso1241dw

    October 16, 2012

    Alpha Centauri in the constellation of Centaurus (The Centaur)

    This chart shows most of the stars visible with the unaided eye on a clear night. The star Alpha Centauri is one of the brightest stars in the southern sky (marked with a red circle). It lies just 4.3 light-years from the Earth and one component in a triple star system.

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  • Hs-2012-07-b-web_print

    January 11, 2012

    Extrasolar Planet Detected by Gravitational Microlensing

    Our Milky Way galaxy contains a minimum of 100 billion planets according to a detailed statistical study based on the detection of three extrasolar planets by an observational technique called microlensing.

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  • Pia15258-full

    January 11, 2012

    Smallest exoplanets compared to Earth and Mars

    This chart compares the smallest known exoplanets, or planets orbiting outside the solar system, to our own planets Mars and Earth.

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  • Ssc2010-10a_sm_prev

    December 08, 2010

    Signature of a Carbon-Rich Planet

    This plot of data from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope indicates the presence of molecules in the planet WASP-12b -- a super-hot gas giant that orbits tightly around its star.

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  • Ssc2010-08a_sm_prev

    October 19, 2010

    How to Find a Planetary Hot Spot

    This graph of data from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows how astronomers located a hot spot on a distant gas planet named upsilon Andromedae b -- and learned that it was in the wrong place.

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  • Ssc2010-05a_sm_prev

    April 21, 2010

    How to Measure Exoplanet Light

    These plots from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope show light from a distant planet, GJ 436b, and its star, as measured at six different infrared wavelengths.

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  • Ssc2009-02a_sm_prev

    January 28, 2009

    Exoplanet HD 80606b Infrared Light Curve

    This figure charts 30 hours of observations taken by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope of a strongly irradiated exoplanet (an planet orbiting a star beyond our own). It shows the very rapid heating the planet experienced as it swung through its closest approach to the star.

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  • Ssc2007-12a_sm_prev

    July 11, 2007

    Exoplanet Forecast: Hot and Wet

    This plot of data from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope tells astronomers that a toasty gas exoplanet, or a planet beyond our solar system, contains water vapor.

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  • Ssc2007-12a_sm_prev

    July 11, 2007

    Exoplanet Forecast: Hot and Wet

    This plot of data from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope tells astronomers that a toasty gas exoplanet, or a planet beyond our solar system, contains water vapor.

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  • Ssc2007-04c_sm_prev

    February 21, 2007

    Cracking the Code of Faraway Worlds: An Exoplanet Atmosphere

    This infrared data from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope tells astronomers that a distant gas planet, a so-called "hot Jupiter" called HD 189733b, might be smothered with high clouds. It is one of the first spectra of an alien world.

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  • Ssc2007-04b_sm_prev

    February 21, 2007

    Cracking the Code of Faraway Worlds: an Exoplanet Atmosphere

    This infrared data from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope tells astronomers that a distant gas planet, a so-called "hot Jupiter" called HD 209458b, might be smothered with high clouds. It is one of the first spectra of an alien world.

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  • Ssc2007-04e_sm

    February 21, 2007

    Isolating a Planet's Spectrum

    This diagram illustrates how astronomers can capture the elusive spectra of hot-Jupiter planets by comparing observations including light from both the star and planet to those containing just the star.

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  • Ssc2007-04b_sm

    February 21, 2007

    Cracking the Code of Faraway Worlds: an Exoplanet Atmosphere

    This infrared data from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope called a spectrum tells astronomers that a distant gas planet, a so-called "hot Jupiter" called HD 209458b, might be smothered with high clouds. It is one of the first spectra of an alien world.

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  • Thumb

    October 12, 2006

    The Light and Dark Sides of a Distant Planet

    The top graph consists of infrared data from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. It tells astronomers that a distant planet, called Upsilon Andromedae b, always has a giant hot spot on the side that faces the star, while the other side is cold and dark. The artist's concepts above the graph illustrate how the planet might look throughout its orbit if viewed up close with infrared eyes.

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  • Untitled-1

    December 14, 2005

    The Invisible Disk

    Astronomers can detect the presence of disks of dust orbiting distant stars by measuring how the combined light from the star and disk changes across different wavelengths.

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  • Ssc2005-09a_ti

    March 22, 2005

    The Language of Planetary Light

    This graph of data from NASA's Spitzer Space telescope shows changes in the infrared light output of two star-planet systems (one above, one below) located hundreds of light-years away.

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  • Ssc2004-20d_ti

    November 09, 2004

    Observing Young Stars: Hitting the 'Sweet Spot'

    What does an extremely young planetary system look like? The answer depends on your point of view. This diagram shows how such a system appears when viewed from different directions.

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